Hey all, I really enjoy Health Care Triage, a video series on health-related issues that often includes the phrase “To the research!” — which is basically my life motto — so of course it’s, like, my fave. You should totally watch these takedowns about milk and vaccines not causing autism.

So I cringed a LOT when I realized I was going to write a blog post being critical about the newest video, on the relationship between BMI and health. It’s based on a giant new meta-analysis. Here is the research paper itself and here is the video:

So.

Look…


In 2018 I wrote this summary of what I learned from watching several dozen “what I take on a flight” videos on YouTube. Mostly what people said then was: choose a good seat and bring your own entertainment. Also: wipes and hydration.

I fly more now than I did then; I’m now solidly in the 99th percentile of frequent fliers. …


Sleep. It’s important. So important, we made an entire podcast episode about it, and that episode is the second longest we’ve recorded (the only longer episode was “How to Rage” - VERY important), and still that episode contained only a fraction of what we wanted to say about how to sleep.

Because that’s now important sleep is.

And of course we got questions about some of the topics we didn’t discuss in the episode. The first was about nightmares. Understanding dreams and nightmares helps exhausted feminist prioritize sleep (which is so important) because it demystifies the sometimes troubling world we…


Sleep is important.

It’s so important, we made an entire podcast episode about it, and that episode is the second longest we’ve recorded (the only longer episode was “How to Rage” — VERY important), and still that episode contained only a fraction of what we wanted to say about how to sleep. Sleep is THAT important.

And of course we got questions about some of the topics we didn’t discuss in the episode. One of them was “how to fall asleep.”

Insomnia — difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep — is the most common sleep disorder, and its most common…


Today I read an op-ed piece in the New York Times by writer Megan Nolan, titled, “Why Do We All Have to Be Beautiful?” with the subtitle, “The message of inclusivity is meant to be helpful, but it can actually do harm.”

As a person whose job description is “to teach women to live with confidence and joy inside their bodies,” I feel compelled to answer her titular question, as far as it can be answered.

Here’s the gist of her piece:

What if I tried something that has always been too frightening to think about? …


2019 is the year we all came together and agreed that burnout is caused by capitalism (also racism and sexism, etc). It’s the Year of Burnout, declares GQ.

Unfortunately, viral article after viral article has concluded either that “ It’s not a problem I can solve,” or “the only solution is revolution.”

Neither of those things is true. In fact, believing burnout is unsolvable is a symptom of burnout. (According to the technical definition, burnout is made of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a decreased sense of accomplishment. …


With #metoo and #believesurvivors amplifying the conversation around sexual violence, more and more survivors are talking about what they’ve experienced. Co-survivors — people who love and support survivors of violence — need to know how to respond when someone tells them they’ve been assaulted. If you’ve never done it before, it can feel overwhelming to hear that kind of story and to learn that someone you care about has experienced such violence.

But you can do it. Let me offer some straightforward advice.

It’s fairly simple, though not even a little bit easy. …


I’ve spent the last three years researching and writing a book called Burnout. My goal was to help women who feel overwhelmed and exhausted by everything they have to do and yet still worry that they’re not doing “enough.” What I learned in that process contradicted all the standard advice in the self-help books I’ve read. And it changed my life.

But the book isn’t coming out until next year, and midterm elections and the Mueller investigation are happening right now, so I want to offer you this one important thing I learned, that contradicted the standard narratives of “self-help.”


Of course I read Girl, Wash Your Face, the massively bestselling self-help book for women. I’ve spent the last three years writing a self-help book for women with my sister; I’m super-interested in what women love to read in a self-help book, plus I’m a longtime reader of self-help myself. Of course I read it!

Rachel Hollis’s voice is engaging, energetic, smart, introspective, and confident. We’d probably enjoy each other’s company.

But once I knew why it was titled Girl, Wash Your Face, the book took on a tragic cast.

The title comes from the last paragraph of the book:


Do you, like me, need a way to spend your time that isn’t merely avoidance of the horrorshow that is 2018, but actively counteracts its ill effects? A kind of 2018 antivenin?

May I recommend a little reading?

Here are four books that have helped me:

It’s Not Always Depression, by Hilary Jacobs Hendel. It’s a highly accessible summary of a therapy modality called AEDP (accelerated experiential dynamic psychotherapy). It’s all feels, all the time, healing just to read, whether or not you ever use the techniques it teaches. But I have used them, and they have helped me. If…

Emily Nagoski

sex educator, author, researcher, and activist. also: nerd. http://go.ted.com/emilynagoski and @emilynagoski

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